5 thoughts on “This smart tea kettle shows the boiling point of bad IoT security

  • September 7, 2017 at 2:10 pm
    Permalink

    From looking at the requirements to successful exploit this attack as published in 2015. This negates to say that you: 1. must be in a physical close location to the devices (within wifi range). 2. You must also have a wifi device with the same SSID as the kettle. 3. You must send special packets to get the kettle to remove it self from the network and your wifi signal must be stronger then the one the kettle is on. And after you do ALL that … then you can do what they talk about in the story. And then to hack everything else in the house you again must be close to the house. So your not doing this attack across the internet.

    Reply
  • September 7, 2017 at 2:10 pm
    Permalink

    perhaps its possible to make it over heat to burn the house

    Reply
  • September 7, 2017 at 2:10 pm
    Permalink

    It's a good thing that you're shedding light on this under-reported issue, but can you please tone down the bad puns ☺️

    Reply
  • September 7, 2017 at 2:10 pm
    Permalink

    Really cool video, wish it was longer. So how does the hacker get access to the kettle without being connected to your network? Does the kettle emit a signal that the hacker can tap into?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *